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Becoming A More Effective Therapist: A Research-Based Synthesis Of Humanistic Psychotherapies

When:
Friday, October 20, 2017, 6:30 PM until 8:30 PM
Where:
UCSF Medical Center at Mt. Zion
2200 Post St.
San Francisco, CA  
Contact:
Annette Taylor
530-205-9533
Category:
CE Workshops
Registration is required
Payment In Advance Only
Registrants & Fees
No Fee
$15.00

San Francisco Psychological Association & CPA present:

 



Becoming A More Effective Therapist:
A Research-based Synthesis of Humanistic Psychotherapies

 

October 20, 2017

6:30-8:30PM

Please arrive at 6PM for registration and snacks

 

UCSF Medical Center at Mt. Zion

2200 Post St., San Francisco, CA

(Entrance is at 1600 Divisadero St.)

2 CE hours

 

Free for SFPA members

Please pre-register online

$15 for non members

 

 

Presenter- David J. Cain, Ph.D.,ABPP

 

Summary of Presentation

The research base of humanistic psychotherapies has burgeoned in the last 20 years. It is now substantial and compelling. The accumulative research evidence is now adequate to propose an integrated model of humanistic practice grounded in well-established evidence-based practice (EBP). This includes quantitative and qualitative research, case studies, change-process research, efficacy and effectiveness research, and RCTs, as well as established clinical experience and wisdom that have stood the test of time.

 

The proposed synthesis identifies the major humanistic variables that affect the process and outcome of humanistic psychotherapies. The review integrates research on humanistic psychotherapies over the past 70+ years, with an emphasis on those bodies of research that are most compelling over time. The twenty proposed premises interweave therapist and client variables, interactive variables, and guidelines regarding where therapists should focus to maximize the effects of therapy. The primary goal of the synthesis is to illuminate how therapists and clients work together to make therapy optimally effective. The proposed integrative model will have wider applications in the larger field of psychotherapy, especially since it has moved increasingly toward integrative models of practice.

 

Learning Objectives

(1) Participants will learn what motivates clients to change.

(2) Participants will learn how therapists contribute to successful outcome.

(3) Participants will learn how clients contribute to or impair therapy

(4) Participants will learn how therapists and clients interaction affects their relationship and the process and outcome of therapy.

 

(5) Participants will learn and understand how the process-outcome relationship affects good outcome

(6) Participants will learn the core elements on which successful effective therapists focus during the course of therapy.

CPA is co-sponsoring with SFPA.

CPA is co-sponsoring with the San Francisco Psychological Association (SFPA). The California Psychological Association (CPA) is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. CPA maintains responsibility for this program and its contents.

Important Notice:
Those who attend the workshop and complete the CPA evaluation form will receive 2 continuing education credits (if the course is approved.) Please note that APA CE rules require that we only give credit to those who attend the entire workshop. Those arriving more than 15 minutes after the start time or leaving before the workshop is completed will not receive CE credits.

                                                                                                                              

                                                                                     

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